[Reading] ➭ American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies) ➵ Barton C. Hacker – Horse-zine.co.uk

American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies) summary American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies), series American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies), book American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies), pdf American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies), American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies) 03c58ecab5 The Growth Of American Engineering And Science Has Affected Military Technology, Organization, And Practice From The Colonial Era To The Present Day Even As Military Concerns Have Influenced, And Often Funded, Domestic Engineering Programs And Scientific Development American Military Technology Traces The Interplay Of Technology And Science With The Armed Forces Of The United States In Terms Of What Hacker And Vining View As Epochs , The Introduction Of Modern Small Arms, Steam Power, And Technology, Science, And Medicine , The Naval Arms Race, Torpedoes And Submarines, And The Signal Corps And The Airplane And , McNamara S Pentagon, Technology In Vietnam, Guided Missiles, And Smart BombsThe Book Is An Excellent Springboard For Understanding The Complex Relationship Of Science, Technology, And War In American History


10 thoughts on “American Military Technology: The Life Story of a Technology (Greenwood Technographies)

  1. says:

    Works of technology history tend to become muddled down in a nuts and bolts examination of harware, reminiscent of engineering articles rather than history Specifically, military technology history, when avoiding those issues, can often devolve into haigiography of specific weapons systems Hacker s American Military technology attempts to avoid both of these extremes by looking at broader issues of how military technology evolved and both influenced, and was influenced by, other areas of American society Hacker argues that the nineteenth century saw advancedments in technology spurred primarily by individual entreprenuers and inventors eager for military contracts While the Civil War saw large changes, for the bulk of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, America lagged behind Europe in terms of military technology That largely changed in World War II In the years before the war, but especially after it, technological research and development became wedded to the military to a large scale, with military implications and directions spurring innovation Seeking to maximize technological advancements became an end unto itself However, this approach, when tested in the fires of the Vietnam War, did not prove decisive in battle as hoped A revised approach after the war, where specific military uses rather than general unbridled advancement guided research, was proved useful in the Gulf War.Essentially, the book presents a simplistic form of the standard narrative about American military technology No new information is presented, and in order to keep said narrative flowing, the work remains general, cursory, extremely brief There are also zero footnotes, particularly troublesome for the various statistics the authors toss around The bibliography is short and, while useful, leaves off many important works In short, it s hard to imagine what the book s purpose is it could easily be double length and explore its subject mroe thoroughly, either from a sociological, doctrinal, or theoretical persepctive, to say nothing of examining details of how various technological pieces work The authors spend much time describing the mechanics of various rifle designs, but when it comes to precision guided weapons, radar, and computing technology, the descriptions become laughingly simplistic if they exist at all The book can serve well as a brief introduction to military technology history, but by avoiding key historiographical debates and neglecting to include fresh new research, readers should approach this with a grain of salt, knowing the true story is far complex.


  2. says:

    Very simple, accessible language Nearly simplistic in places Good for an overview but not an in depth reference text Definitely a starting point.


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