❴Reading❵ ➶ Die Wand Author Marlen Haushofer – Horse-zine.co.uk

Die Wand files Die Wand, read online Die Wand, free Die Wand, free Die Wand, Die Wand a53b673c9 Eine Frau Will Mit Ihrer Kusine Und Deren Mann Ein Paar Tage In Einem Jagdhaus In Den Bergen Verbringen Nach Der Ankunft Unternimmt Das Paar Noch Einen Gang Ins N Chste Dorf Und Kehrt Nicht Mehr Zur Ck Am N Chsten Morgen St T Die Frau Auf Eine Un Berwindbare Wand, Hinter Der Totenstarre Herrscht Abgeschlossen Von Der Brigen Welt, Richtet Sie Sich Inmittten Ihres Engumgrenzten St Cks Natur Und Umgeben Von Einigen Zugelaufenen Tieren Aufs Berleben Ein


10 thoughts on “Die Wand

  1. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  2. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  3. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  4. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  5. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  6. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  7. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  8. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  9. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


  10. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutting the grass, haymaking, preparing stuff for winter And caring for her animals, since there s a dog, cats and cow, and later also a bullock she s responsible for them too.I ve placed that one on dystopian shelf though to tell the truth I do not care much about that tag To the end we do not know what really happened Was it a devilish military experiment that went out of control Perhaps some foul deed, maybe part of war campaigne that did so wrong Or maybe some apocaliptic vision of the world The novel is everyting above and much It s like a record of adventures of Robinson Crusoe but without company of his Friday it s a manual guide on how to survive in wilderness and it s still much than that It s a quiet meditation on human nature, nature of time and our role on the Earth, our responsibility for beings dependent on us And about recognition that old life is lost and one need to find another way.How many things do we need to live You would probably say that plenty We hoard and goods but how many things we do really need to survive One would do without much stuff in fact And that way the novel may be read as an objection to our greedy politics and unsatiable consumerism We were told that no man is a separated island, but really We don t need any apocalypse for we are already divided and we keep building our walls without restraints And that way The Wall feels like a critique of our acceptance of loosening interpersonal relationship and moral relaxation, like a statement that maybe world that lack love doesen t deserve to exist You needed twenty years to bring up your children but it only took mere seconds to kill them Love seemed to be the only reasonable instict and right thing to do and by rejecting it our chance was irremediably forfeited.The novel is simply written and I found it beautiful I especially liked these chapters concerning one unforgettable summer in alpine tundra over her cabin These days where she had all her animals yet and used to stay long at night, scenting almost intoxicating fragrances of flowers and herbs, looking at the starry sky and experienced such tranquility and communion with the world, something that felt almost transcendental, that even being probably the last human being still could be at ease with herself and surrounding world Though when she writes her account she doesn t feel it any , yet still knows there was a beauty in it.


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